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Overlapping Threads: Probing the Sociotechnical Fabric of AI

Friday, February 16 | 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Henry A. and Elvira H. Jubel Hall, 121

Daricia Wilkinson
Postdoctoral Associate 
Microsoft Research
 

AI and data-driven technologies have permeated multiple aspects of our lives often interweaving with core functions across society. Billions of people now rely on AI-powered technologies. However, as we push boundaries and widen AI integration these systems have been known to extend existing social ills while creating new types of harm at an exponential rate thus making the imperative to cultivate safe and responsible technologies a pressing matter.

In this talk, I will present findings from multiple studies that illustrate the importance of adopting a sociotechnical lens to investigate the types of harms that occur in AI systems, how those harms occur, who this affects, as well as the tools, artifacts, and processes that claim to offer accountability. Through interdisciplinary methodologies, I offer empirical evidence that reshapes the narrative of AI’s impact by extending the global coverage of AI-related harm, our understanding of diverging thresholds of safety, and identifying opportunities for bridge building among different actors who are charged with accountability in this space.


Talk Location: Jubel 121

Event Type

Seminar/Colloquia

Schools

McKelvey School of Engineering

Topic

Science & Technology

Website

https://cse.wustl.edu/news-events/col...

Department
Computer Science & Engineering
Event Contact

cody.copeland@wustl.edu

Speaker Information

Dr. Wilkinson is a Post-Doctoral Researcher in the Fairness, Accountability, Transparency, and Ethics (FATE) group at Microsoft Research. Daricia is passionate about finding ways to design safety tools to make the internet a safer place for all people. As such, her work weaves together strings from Human-Computer Interaction and Artificial Intelligence to highlight opportunities for fairness, transparency, and justice online. Prior to joining MSR, she earned her Ph.D. in Human-Centered Computing at Clemson University under the advisement of Dr. Bart Knijnenburg. Daricia’s dissertation investigated alternative pathways for the design of justice-oriented safety countermeasures particularly for people in non-Western contexts. During her tenure as a graduate student, she was named as a Meta Fellow (formerly Facebook), Google Scholar, and in 2022 she was named one of the top 100 women in AI ethics.

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