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Kinship Novels of Early Modern Korea: Between Genealogical Time and the Domestic Everyday

Friday, March 5, 2021 | 4:00 PM

Virtual Event

Ksenia Chizhova, assistant professor of Korean literature and cultural studies, Princeton University, will present.

Violence and bloody family feuds constitute the core of the so-called lineage novels (kamun sosŏl) that circulated in Chosŏn Korea from the late seventeenth to the early twentieth century. Such subject matter becomes ever more puzzling when we consider that the main audience for these texts were elite women of Korea, who were subjected to exacting comportment standards and domestic discipline. Coeval with the rise and fall of Korean patrilineal kinship, these texts depict the genealogical subject—emotional self socialized through the structures of prescriptive kinship, but kinship itself is treated as a series of conflicts between genders and generations.

This talk will contextualize lineage novels and the domestic world in which they were read within the patrilineal transformation of the Chosŏn society and the emergence of elite vernacular Korean culture, patronaged by elite women. The proliferation of kinship narratives in the Chosŏn period illuminates the changing affective contours of familial bonds and how the domestic space functioned as a site of their everyday experience. Drawing on an archive of women-centered elite vernacular texts, this talk uncovers the structures of feelings and conceptions of selfhood beneath official genealogies and legal statutes, revealing that kinship is as much a textual as a social practice.

Registration required to attend Zoom lecture.

Sponsored by the East Asian Studies program

Schools

Arts & Sciences

Topic

Humanities & Society

Website

https://artsci.wustl.edu/events/kinsh...

Department
East Asian Studies
Event Contact

eas@wustl.edu

Speaker Information
Ksenia Chizhova, assistant professor of Korean literature and cultural studies, Princeton University
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