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McKelvey School of Engineering

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IMSE Seminar "Material Challenges in Our Direct Methanol Fuel Cell and Li-O2 Battery Research"

Monday, September 19, 2022 | 1:00 PM

Stephen F. & Camilla T. Brauer Hall, 12
6548 Forest Park Pkwy, St. Louis, MO 63112, USA

Prof. Xianglin Li, Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science, Washington University in St. Louis. 

Our research has always centered around energy storage and conversion technologies. The advance in materials and structures is critical to push the boundary of fuel cells and rechargeable lithium batteries. While my team focuses on the transport phenomena in porous electrodes of fuel cells and batteries, we have close collaborations with research teams with strong expertise in material synthesis, characterization, and testing. This talk will begin with introductions of direct methanol fuel cells and Li-O2 batteries, followed by our progress and discoveries, and finish with the material challenges we face in our projects. The talk aims to inform the audience about liquid fuel cells and rechargeable batteries, and intrigue discussions, ideas, and collaborations to advance these research areas further.

Event Type

Seminar/Colloquia

Schools

Arts & Sciences, McKelvey School of Engineering

Topic

Science & Technology

Website

https://imse.wustl.edu/

Department
Institute of Materials Science & Engineering, Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science
Event Contact

Beth Gartin, bgartin@wustl.edu

Speaker Information

 Dr. Xianglin Li joined the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science at Washington University in St. Louis (WashU) in 2022. His current research projects are closely related to energy technologies, including direct methanol fuel cells, Li-O2 batteries, battery thermal management, and advanced heat transfer systems for space applications. He has published more than 50 refereed journal articles in energy-related areas. Before joining WashU, he was an Assistant and then Associate Professor at the University of Kansas (KU). He receives several awards, including the NSF CAREER Award, Bellows Scholar Award from KU School of Engineering (twice), and Cramer Award from KU Department of Mechanical Engineering. He received his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Connecticut in 2012.

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