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McKelvey School of Engineering

Drugs Should Be Designed with Delivery in Mind (and Vice Versa)

Thursday, September 17 | 10:00 AM

Virtual Event

As part of the BME seminar series, join us for this presentation by Cory Berkland, Solon E. Summerfield Distinguished Professorship in the Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry and in the Department of Chemical Engineering at The University of Kansas.

This seminar will be virtual.   Register for this event by going here.

Abstract:  Effective delivery of drugs to therapeutic targets requires an understanding of biological barriers, transport in vivo, physicochemical properties of drug molecules, and formulation.  Basic principles have emerged for oral and intravenous drug design, but fewer efforts have aimed to create drugs that persist at the administration site or molecular structures that promote drainage to regional lymphatic networks.  With these challenges in mind, pertinent drug transport and local elimination mechanisms will be overviewed.  Then, three examples of molecular designs to direct drug delivery will be presented.  (1) Pharmaceutical aerosols must transit anatomical barriers to reach the desired target, a pathogen for example.  Once deposited, drugs must diffuse to intended targets prior to mucociliary clearance or absorption.  Novel structures that persist in mucus to eradicate pathogens will be presented.  (2) Soluble antigen arrays (SAgAs) were designed by our lab to promote the drainage of autoantigens to secondary lymphoid organs to treat autoimmune diseases.  Specifically, the size and solubility of these molecular constructs were tuned to promote access to the lymphatic compartment and induce immune tolerance in mouse models of multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes.  (3) Our lab has recently explored the design of immunostimulants that persist in tumor tissue after intratumoral/perilesional injection.  Intratumoral immunotherapy is proposed to work synergistically with checkpoint inhibitors making a nonresponsive ‘cold’ tumor ‘hot’ by recruiting and activating tumor infiltrating lymphocytes.  This approach can suffer from systemic immune-related adverse reactions, however, if enough immunostimulant escapes the site of administration.  Data on the use of electrostatic mechanisms to promote tumor retention will be presented.  These examples underscore the need for rational design of drug molecules or formulations based upon the route of delivery and biological barriers encountered.     

Biography: Cory Berkland holds the Solon E. Summerfield Distinguished Professorship in the Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry and in the Department of Chemical Engineering at The University of Kansas.  He received MS and PhD degrees from the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign and a BS degree in Chemical Engineering from Iowa State University in Ames.  His lab studies pharmaceuticals and biomaterials with a particular emphasis on molecular design and transport in the human body.  Prof. Berkland is a co-founder of Orbis Biosciences (purchased by Adare Pharmaceuticals), Savara Pharmaceuticals (NASDAQ: SVRA), Bond Biosciences, and Orion BioScience.  

Event Type

Seminar/Colloquia

Schools

McKelvey School of Engineering

Tags

symposium

Department
Biomedical Engineering
Event Contact

Suesy Seel | 314-935-2720 | susanseel@wustl.edu

Speaker Information

Solon E. Summerfield Distinguished Professorship in the Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry and in the Department of Chemical Engineering at The University of Kansas

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