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McKelvey School of Engineering

BME Seminar: Jon Silva

Thursday, October 28 | 10:00 AM

Uncas A. Whitaker Hall, 218
6760 Forest Park Pkwy, St. Louis, MO 63105, USA

Presenting on "Precision Antiarrhythmic Medicine"

Jon Silva, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Biomedical Engineering, Washington University, will speak at 10:00 CST on Thursday, October 28, 2021 in Whitaker 218.

Abstract: The Silva lab focuses on using emerging technologies to develop new therapeutic approaches to treat patients with cardiac arrhythmia.  We have used cutting-edge imaging to discover the connection between the conformational dynamics of the cardiac Na+ channel and patient response to drug therapy.  This insight allowed us to develop an algorithm that predicted whether patients would respond to mexiletine therapy, based on their genetic background.  A second project has leveraged new developments in the field of augmented reality to guide interventional procedures that are used to treat arrhythmia.  Clinical studies show that physician accuracy is significantly improved with a display that presents the anatomy in 3 dimensions.

NOTE:
Parking is available outside of Whitaker Hall in the East End Garage. Click here for the map. If taking the subway, the nearest metrolink stop is Skinker.

Event Type

Seminar/Colloquia

Schools

McKelvey School of Engineering

Topic

Science & Technology, Medicine & Health

Department
Biomedical Engineering
Hashtag

#WashUBME

Event Contact

Mimi Hilburg | mhilburg@wustl.edu

Speaker Information

Professor Silva joined the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis in July 2012 after receiving the Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Award at the Scientific Interface (CASI).  Professor Silva’s laboratory has created novel algorithms that predict whether patients will respond to class I anti-arrhythmic molecules. These predictions are based on machine learning approaches that leverage a deep understanding of drug interaction biophysics. His group also developed software to provide a holographic display to physicians who perform catheter ablations for arrhythmia. This software was recently tested in humans, and the results showed that physician accuracy was significantly improved with the display. A company that he co-founded, SentiAR Inc, is commercializing the technology.

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